Science, technology, and other cool stuff from the folks behind public radio's Science Friday. It's brain fun, for curious people.
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amnhnyc:

Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, was unveiled at the Museum this afternoon. He will be on public view for just over 3 months, through January 4, 2015. Museum scientists worked closely with taxidermy experts to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life. 

Learn more about Lonesome George

Is ‘sparklemuffin’ one word?
Overheard at the SciFri Offices. (Yes, of course it is)
Are you ready to shake your silk-maker? Meet ‘Sparklemuffin’ the peacock spider (yes, that’s what scientists call him), one of the lords of arachnid dance.
Peacock spiders are already known for their elaborate mating dances, but recent research shows that they also ‘sing’.

Are you ready to shake your silk-maker? Meet ‘Sparklemuffin’ the peacock spider (yes, that’s what scientists call him), one of the lords of arachnid dance.

Peacock spiders are already known for their elaborate mating dances, but recent research shows that they also ‘sing’.

scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)

(via laboratoryequipment)

“The birds were feeding, and it was just this quiet, still day,” says photographer Rosalie Winard, who began capturing birds at Great Salt Lake on black and white infrared film in 2002. “That was one of the pictures that helped me fall in love with the lake.”

American avocets are one of 314 North American bird species that could lose more than half of their current geographic range because of climate change, according to research released last week by the National Audubon Society.

Learn more here.

sweetteascience:

If you want to know what documentary I will be watching on Wednesday, listen to this completely inspiring interview with Sylvia Earle on sciencefriday!  Why am I watching a science documentary on Wednesday?  Head over to the STS Blog for details!

Today’s must-watch over at the New York Times: SciFri alum Flora Lichtman tells the story of Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the Dutch haberdasher who discovered microbes, with beautiful paper puppets.

elespermatozoidemesozoico:

The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) and an Amphicyon ingens chasing a Ramoceros osborni in the AMNH.
Photos by me.

Un oso de las cavernas (Ursus spelaeus) y un Amphicyon ingens cazando a un Ramoceros osborni en el AMNH.
Fotos mías.

(via paleoillustration)