Science, technology, and other cool stuff from the folks behind public radio's Science Friday. It's brain fun, for curious people.
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See which Californians, by county, are increasing water use despite the drought

And according to Southern California Public Radio environmental reporter Molly Peterson, locals are still just hoping for more rain. Listen to the SciFri interview here.

After a hiatus, the SciFri Book Club is back!

This summer’s pick is a science fiction classic: Frank Herbert’s ecological epic “Dune.” Share your “Dune” comments, questions, quotes, and media with us by using #SciFriBookClub or emailing us at bookclub@sciencefriday.com.

Learn more about SciFri Book Club by visiting sciencefriday.com/bookclub

National Moth Week co-founder Dave Moskowitz shared these beautiful photos with us. Tune in on Friday to hear Rutgers University moth expert Elena Tartaglia talk more about these fascinating creatures.

It’s July 22, or 22/7, which means it’s Pi Approximation Day!

Did you know you can approximate pi by simply dropping sticks? See how close you can get with this simulator based on an experiment called Buffon’s needle.

rhamphotheca:

So… Yeah, Dark Energy.

We can’t see it and we don’t know what it is. So are physicists just making it up? Not at all: here are four good reasons why we think the universe is being warped by the dark side…

(Go here to register with New Scientist and read the full article)

(via New Scientist)

This week’s Picture of the Week is the Io moth, the symbol of National Moth Week.

As a caterpillar, it is covered in poisonous spikes. When it’s matured, the moth doesn’t feed at all, surviving solely on energy during its brief life. Learn more here.

Want to add a little more bling to your clothing? Here’s a DIY guide to incorporating LEDs into your favorite accessories.

Why is it best to lay off the blue when making suede shoes? Different fabrics absorb different amounts of dye.

Why is it best to lay off the blue when making suede shoes? Different fabrics absorb different amounts of dye.